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Solaris BART (Basic Auditing and Reporting Tool)

BART (Basic Auditing and Reporting Tool) provides the ability to determine file-level changes at a granular level within the Solaris 10 operating system. This is achieved via the creation of 2 manifest files (a control-manifest and test-manifest), each manifest catalogs the attributes of each file and then a comparison is run between the files and the subsequent discrepancies displayed. The option of a rules files is also supplied allowing the administrator to define which files, folders and attributes are to be cataloged and compared.

Configuring BART

Configuring BART requires:

1.    BART Installation
2.    Creation of a rules file
3.    Generating a control-manifest file
4.    Generating a test-manifest file
5.    Comparison of the control-manifest and test-manifest files.

BART Installation

BART is installed via the installation of the SUNWbart binary. This binary is normally found within the Solaris Installation CD.

pkgadd -i SUNWbart

Once the BART binary is installed it is also worth creating a BART directory in order to store your BART files.

mkdir /bart

Creation of a Rules File

The rules file will define which attributes and files are cataloged and compared against. Create a file within /bart named bart.rules.
Below is an example based on specifying the contents and time attributes for files within the /etc directly.

IGNORE all
CHECK contents mtime
/etc

Generating a control-manifest file

bart create -r /bart/bart.rules > /bart/bart.manifest

Generating a test-manifest file

bart create -r /bart/bart.rules > /bart/bart.manifest-`date ‘+%d%m%Y’`

Comparison of the control-manifest and test-manifest files.

Compare the 2 manifest files.

bart compare -r /bart/bart.rules -p /bart/bart.manifest /bart/bart.manifest-`date ‘+%d%m%Y’`

Tags: UNIX

About the Author

RDonato

R Donato

Rick Donato is the Founder and Chief Editor of Fir3net.com. He currently works as a Principal Network Security Engineer and has a keen interest in automation and the cloud.

You can find Rick on Twitter @f3lix001